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Medical Science Monitor Basic Research
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AmJCaseRep
MedSciTechnol

eISSN: 2329-0358

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SARS-CoV-2 Infection in Transplant-Related Biology: Where Do We stand?

Deqiang Kong, Mingming Li, Weihua Gong

(Department of Surgery, Second Affiliated Hospital of School of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, Zhejiang, China (mainland))

Ann Transplant 2020; 25:e924768

DOI: 10.12659/AOT.924768


ABSTRACT: Since December 2019, the novel coronavirus (SARS-CoV-2) emerged in Wuhan and rapidly spread throughout the world. There are nearly 3 951 905 confirmed cases of novel coronary pneumonia and more than 275 067 deaths worldwide, [JHU data-09/05/2020, https://www.arcgis.com/apps/opsdashboard/index.html#/bda7594740fd40299423467b48e9ecf6]. A great number of patients contracted SARS-Cov-2 pneumonia (COVID-19). SARS-CoV-2 invades human target cells through receptor angiotensin-converting enzyme II (ACE2), which are expressed in the lung, kidney, and ileum and mediate inflammatory responses and immune activities. High plasma levels of proinflammatory cytokines were detected in the infected patients. These factors may predispose transplant patients to high risk of poor outcomes. Therefore, transplant patients might be affected by this coronavirus infection and protection of allografts should receive special attention during this outbreak. In the present study we attempt to delineate the transplant-related biology of SARS-CoV-2 infection.

This paper has been published under Creative Common Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International (CC BY-NC-ND 4.0) allowing to download articles and share them with others as long as they credit the authors and the publisher, but without permission to change them in any way or use them commercially.
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