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Medical Science Monitor Basic Research

AmJCaseRep
MedSciTechnol

eISSN: 2329-0358

Early Initiation of Everolimus After Liver Transplantation: A Single-Center Experience

Uta Herden, Antonio Galante, Lutz Fischer, Sven Pischke, Jun Li, Eike Achilles, Martina Koch, Bjoern Nashan, Martina Sterneck

Department of Hepatobiliary and Transplant Surgery, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg, Germany

Ann Transplant 2016; 21:77-85

DOI: 10.12659/AOT.895800

Available online:

Published: 2016-02-04


#895800

BACKGROUND: Evidence relating to early everolimus use after liver transplantation remains limited.
MATERIAL AND METHODS: Ninety-one adult patients undergoing liver transplantation at our center during 2007–2012 in whom everolimus therapy was initiated <3 months post-transplant were analyzed retrospectively. Everolimus was started on days 1–5 in 50 patients (group 1) and after day 5 in 41 patients (group 2). Most patients continued to receive low-dose cyclosporine (59.3%, target 50–80 ng/ml) or low-dose tacrolimus (25.3%; target 3–5 ng/ml). Mean follow-up was 4.6 years.
RESULTS: One-, three- and five-year patient survival rates were 80.5%, 74.2%, and 70.5%, respectively, and did not differ between groups 1 and 2. Six patients (6.6%) developed biopsy-proven acute rejection after a median of 47 days (range 27–356 days). Everolimus was discontinued due to adverse events in 21 patients (23.1%). Incisional hernia repair occurred in 14.0% and 9.4% of patients in group 1 and 2, respectively. Renal function remained stable during follow-up, despite poor baseline function.
CONCLUSIONS: Everolimus with very low-dose calcineurin inhibitor given immediately after liver transplantation appears safe and effective, achieving a low rejection rate with well-preserved renal function.

Keywords: Cyclosporine, Immunosuppressive Agents, Liver Transplantation, Tacrolimus



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