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Medical Science Monitor Basic Research

AmJCaseRep
MedSciTechnol

eISSN: 2329-0358

Pregnancy after Kidney and Liver Transplantation: Its Outcome and Effect on the Graft, Mother, and Neonate

Tomasz Songin, Bronislawa Pietrzak, Robert Brawura-Biskupski-Samaha, Bożena Kociszewska-Najman, Zoulikha Jabiry-Zieniewicz, Anna Cyganek, Joanna Pazik, Mirosław Wielgos

1st Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Center For Postgraduate Medical Education, W. Orłowski Hospital, Warsaw, Poland

Ann Transplant 2014; 19:660-666

DOI: 10.12659/AOT.892232

Available online: 2014-12-18

Published: 2014-12-18


Background: The influence of pregnancy on graft function in patients after solid organ transplantation is still uncertain.
Material and Methods: Our study is based on a group of 78 cases after liver (LTR) and/or renal transplantation (RTR) with 91 deliveries in the past 12 years in the 1st Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Warsaw Medical University. We compared duration of pregnancy, mode of delivery, weight of neonates, and graft function.
Results: Rate of preterm delivery was very high (74% RTR and 43% LTR). The average duration of pregnancy was shorter in the RTR than in the LTR group (34.7 vs. 36.8 p<0.001) with a high rate of cesarean sections (81.4% in RTR and 68.1% in LTR). Birth weight in LTR (2898 g) was higher than in RTR (2248 g) (p<0.0001). Currently, 29 RTR and 38 LTR have preserved graft function. Thus, graft survival in the study group is longer than in the general RTR or LTR population.
Conclusions: Pregnancy after kidney or liver transplantation does not seem to increase the risk of graft loss, but is associated with a higher risk of maternal and fetal complications. In our data these complications occur more often in the RTR group.

Keywords: Immunosuppression, Kidney Transplantation, Liver Transplantation, Pregnancy, High-Risk, Premature Birth



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